Could technology render external assessment irrelevant?

18/02/2014John Ingram, Managing Director, RM Assessment & Data

“If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”  So, reputedly, said Henry Ford on the topic of innovation. Regardless of the quote’s authenticity, it’s a useful reminder to step outside the norm from time to time and wonder what a bolt from the blue would do to our day-to-day existence.

Technology has already streamlined our assessment processes. According to Ofqual, onscreen marking is now the main type of marking for general qualifications in the UK. Onscreen marking involves scanning exam papers and digitally distributing them to examiners to mark using specialist software. In 2012 66% of nearly 16 million exam scripts were marked this way in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Onscreen marking is also gaining in popularity in other territories: RM’s onscreen marking system has been used by awarding organisations in Eastern Europe, North America, Asia and Australasia.

As well as reducing the time and risk involved in transporting exam papers to and fro, onscreen marking improves reliability by automatically adding up the marks. Teams of examiners can be monitored in real time, with the system stopping under-performing markers from marking further questions.

On the whole, however, onscreen marking is just a smarter way of assessing hand-written exams. The fact that it can also be used to mark computer-based tests, coursework and audio-visual files is becoming less relevant in a country such as England where the emphasis is on linear assessment and paper-based exams, at least where school exams are concerned.

Let’s call onscreen marking of exams ‘faster horses’, then; it’s better than marking by hand but it doesn’t revolutionise the way we evaluate learning. So what’s the ‘motorcar’? Tests taken on computer? Countries such as Denmark and Norway have introduced computer-based testing for national exams. The next round of PISA tests in 2015 will be taken on computer. Moving from paper to computers does feel like progress – until you look around you.

The world has moved on to tablets, smartphones and – those clunky phrases – the ‘internet of things’ and ‘the internet of customers’. Which could mean that while we polish our current system to its highest possible sparkle, waiting in the wings is a disruptor which will render it irrelevant.

It’s perhaps natural that in education, where the stakes are so high, there can be fear of technology. There’s a worry that hi-tech can mean low quality – quicker, shorter, and more superficial assessment. But that needn’t be the case.

We’re already seeing glimmers of new ways of experiencing and demonstrating learning. Open badges add context to academic achievement. MOOCs offer access to expertise from all over the world. There will always be a place for face-to-face teaching and core subjects, but the way we learn is becoming broader, more granular, more accessible. With digitisation comes the expectation of immediacy: on-demand exams, instant results, instant certificates to share online.

For education to exploit technology for our children’s benefit, we need to learn from other fields. So far this year we’ve seen babygrows that monitor temperature and breathing. Contact lenses that measure glucose levels. Even toothbrushes that tell tales to your dentist when you’ve been less than thorough. It isn’t too much of a stretch to imagine multiple data streams which continually monitor a student’s development and trigger a feedback loop to help them gain the required level of attainment. Meaning a one-off, external exam is rendered unnecessary. Will it happen by 2025?  To answer that with any certainty I’d need to ditch my smartphone and dig out the crystal ball.

One thought on “Could technology render external assessment irrelevant?

  1. Technology can improve the efficiency of assessment but the purpose of external assessment is one of confidence in quality assurance not marking papers. Since we are not even at the stage of doing written exams routinely on computers – its done on paper and scanned – it seems that a fully automated process that makes intelligent judgements from student’s day to day work is a long way off. There is also an assumption here that GCSEs and A levels are the majority of assessments used. They are in fact a small minority when we consider the whole scheme of things. We could do driving tests on a simulator now but we don’t. There is insufficient confidence in the technology to trust it in a live practical context. There is also too big a range of niche assessments that make a computer simulation not viable. eg I have just done certificates in additive manufacture. It would be possible to do this on a computer but the market is not big enough to make the R&D of the software viable. Then there are practical activities such as a qualification in art where a computer judgement is not going to be easy.

    So in theory computers can do most things but in practice it is likely to be a long time before they do if for no other reason than public and politicians are unlikely to accept lack of human verification in the quality assurance process. We can fly planes without pilots perfectly reliably but would people fly on pilotless planes?

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